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#  Tuesday, 05 August 2008

The MSDN article Synchronous and Asynchronous Operations explains what options are available to you when using WCF. It even tells me that svcutil.exe has an /async switch. Great!

Now, back to my current home turf, Compact Framework. There is netCFsvcutil.exe, that comes with the Compact Framework Power Toys 3.5. Guess what? That option isn't available in this scaled down rendition of svcutil.

Once again Compact Framework makes it so much harder to work productively, and here's why:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/2e08f6yc.aspx

Quote: Asynchronous delegates, specifically the BeginInvoke and EndInvoke methods, are not supported in the .NET Compact Framework.

Back to the drawing board and the thread pool (most likely).

Categories: .NET | 3.5 | Smartphone and PocketPC
Tuesday, 05 August 2008 18:43:23 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 

Guilty Party Acer with its Acer Aspire One 110L

Charge Linking keyboard layout to selected user interface language

Aggravating Circumstances Overwriting configuration file on reboot with hardwired defaults for keyboard layout according to language settings

(Interim) Fix http://blog.laptopmag.com/acer-aspire-one-an-in-depth-look#comment-11841

Verdict Even my very seasoned Linux guru that helped me fix it (I failed miserably) was flabbergasted about this crude approach to internationalization. Sorry, but that's not the way to win over seasoned Windows users.

Categories: L-Word Stuff
Tuesday, 05 August 2008 10:33:43 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Wednesday, 30 July 2008

I am currently working on a Compact Framework project, and started development on a different machine - where I successfully used the Cellular Emulator of the Windows Mobile SDK. Today, on the other machine (the laptop), it didn't start but present me with the following error message:

After some searching (on the G-word search engine), I came across this post:

http://forums.microsoft.com/MSDN/ShowPost.aspx?PostID=3538593&SiteID=1

Sure enough I am using Vista x64, heck, we are living in 2008 with multicore CPUs and 4GB+ of RAM!

And here is the Catch 22: when moving development to a Virtual PC image, you don't get USB ports which you need for connecting to a real device...

Categories: .NET | Smartphone and PocketPC | Vista | x64
Wednesday, 30 July 2008 16:55:11 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [1]

 



#  Wednesday, 23 July 2008

I have created another (hopefully useful) checkin policy for Team Foundation Server 2008 - one that checks C# and VB.NET project files for COM references. The idea came from a customer, where they require the developers to use "authorized" interop assemblies instead of developers recreating those by simply adding a COM reference to each and every project. And how do you prevent this? By having a TFS checkin policy in place.

A COM reference looks like this in an MSBuild project file:

  <ItemGroup>
    <COMReference Include="XcpControlLib">
      <Guid>{283C8576-0726-4DBC-9609-3F855162009A}</Guid>
      <VersionMajor>1</VersionMajor>
      <VersionMinor>0</VersionMinor>
      <Lcid>0</Lcid>
      <WrapperTool>tlbimp</WrapperTool>
      <Isolated>False</Isolated>
    </COMReference>
  </ItemGroup>

Instead of searching for the string "<COMReference" I decided to use the MSBuild Engine API in my implementation:

    public override PolicyFailure[] Evaluate()
    {
      PendingChange[] checkedFiles = PendingCheckin.PendingChanges.CheckedPendingChanges;
      ArrayList failures = new ArrayList();

      foreach (PendingChange change in checkedFiles)
      {
        string extension = Path.GetExtension(change.LocalItem);

        if ((0 == String.Compare(extension, ".csproj", false)) ||
            (0 == String.Compare(extension, ".vbproj", false)))
        {
          if (change.ChangeType == ChangeType.Edit || change.ChangeType == ChangeType.Add)
          {
            // this is a workaround because project.Load(fileName doesn't work in the same process as VS
            FileStream fs = File.OpenRead(change.LocalItem);

            Project project = new Project();
            project.Load(new StreamReader(fs), ProjectLoadSettings.IgnoreMissingImports);

            foreach (BuildItemGroup big in project.ItemGroups)
            {
              foreach (BuildItem bi in big)
              {
                if (0 == String.Compare(bi.Name, "COMReference", true))
                {
                  PolicyFailure failure = new PolicyFailure(String.Format(ComReferencePolicyStrings.activateMessage, change.LocalItem), this);
                  failures.Add(failure);
                }
              }
            }
          }
        }
      }

      return (PolicyFailure[])failures.ToArray(typeof(PolicyFailure));
    }

At first, I tried to load directly from the .??proj files, but Visual Studio (after thinking a bit about it it is pretty obvious...) doesn't like someone inside its process play around with the MSBuild engine. That's why I resorted to loading it indirectly.

For installation I have provided checkinpolicy.reg, however, you must adapt the path to the .dll before importing it into the registry.

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\VisualStudio\9.0\TeamFoundation\SourceControl\Checkin Policies]
"ChrisOnNet.CheckinPolicies.ComReferencePolicy"="C:\\Work\\ChrisOnNet.CheckinPolicies.ComReferencePolicy.dll"

Once registered, you can add it to your team projects:

As usual I have included the source code (BSD licensed) in the download:

ChrisOnNet.CheckinPolicies.ComReferencePolicy.zip (35.35 KB)

Categories: C# | Team System | Use the source Luke
Wednesday, 23 July 2008 15:04:16 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Thursday, 01 May 2008

A friend of mine lent me his copy of Crypto (by Steven Levy) last week, today I got around to finish reading it (been pretty busy lately as you can tell from close to zero new posts on this blog).

What's especially interesting about this book is the history, the background. In the past, I have read a couple of technical-level books, even attended Crypto conference in Santa Barbara in 1997. What this book highlights are the connections between the acting persons (mathematicans may forgive me) as well as the whole shenanigans of trying to put the genie back in the bottle. I do remember some of those (PGP, low international key strengths, Clipper), but never read about them in such detail.

If you have some time to spare, definitely worth your time to understand how cryptography went public.

Categories: Books | Security
Thursday, 01 May 2008 16:18:27 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Tuesday, 08 April 2008

Today is the last leg of a total of four stations of this year's Big>Days (Helden von Heute) event from Microsoft Austria. I am speaking in the developers track on ALM (Application Lifecycle Management) with Visual Studio Team System (and beyond) together with Georg Drobny from MS Consulting Services. We only have seventy minutes to get this topic across, which really is a challenge when covering such an important topic. But so far, we managed to overrun our alotted time only very little. Let's see how it works out today.

Tuesday, 08 April 2008 13:57:21 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Thursday, 21 February 2008

It's been quiet on this blog recently, one reason being that it is conference season again. Last week, I was in Munich for VSone, where I did three talks:

  • LINQ to SQL
  • ADO.NET Entity Framework
  • ADO.NET Data Services

At this very moment, I am at the airport in Frankfurt waiting for my flight back from the ready.for.take.off Visual Studio 2008 / Windows Server 2008 / SQL Server 2008 launch event here in Germany. It was the biggest developer event in Germany so far (7000+ conference participants), and Microsoft gave away quite a nice package of software: VS Standard, TFS with one CAL, Windows Server 2008 Enterprise with 5 CALs plus a voucher for SQL Server 2008 that will be available later this year.

I was staffing ATE (Ask the Experts) at this event, initially for IIS7. However, we were very pleasantly surprised that the attendees showed great interest in TFS / VSTS, so I switched duties to that area (VSTS / TFS is a growing business for me as I do training and consulting for those products). Hopefully this free license will trigger more adoption because Team System is such a great tool!

Thursday, 21 February 2008 21:09:30 (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Friday, 08 February 2008

Yesterday, we found ourselves at the receiving end of an attack against one of our German Wikis that are running the ScrewTurn Wiki software. Turns out that it was a security issue even with the then latest version 2.0.23. Dario Solera - the maintainer of ScrewTurn - acted real fast when I informed him about the root cause of the attack and released v2.0.24 yesterday night.

Please download and upgrade immediately! The issue is being actively exploited (zero day if you so will).

Categories: ASP.NET | Security | this | Use the source Luke
Friday, 08 February 2008 07:54:08 (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Thursday, 17 January 2008

Yesterday I finally started my RC1 Server 2008 installation to replace the older Beta 3 setup. However, one piece of software refuses to install - Cygwin:

The funny part - it worked just nicely in Beta 3 (I need it for WebSVN, which now obviously is offline). But at least it seems that I am not alone with this issue: Installation problem with Windows Server 2008

Categories: IIS | Longhorn
Thursday, 17 January 2008 13:57:32 (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Thursday, 13 December 2007

This is a bugfix release for the previously posted port of nGallery to ASP.NET 3.5. The following changes are incorporated:

  • Bugfix: slideshow had "photos/" hardcoded in nGalleryLib (for navigation buttons)
  • Bugfix: Event log exceptions, please see Get GoogleBot to crash your .NET 2.0 site (plus ASP.NET 2 + url rewriting considered harmful in some cases). Nicolas Sorel was nice enough to provide me with his .browser definition files.
  • Bugfix: default_highlight_image.jpg no longer resided in /photos and therefore caused an exception for galleries that had no highlighted image; moved it back to \photos
  • Change: AlbumHandler no longer implements IHttpHandler
  • Change: AssemblyInfo.cs changed version to 2.0 to differentiate from original 1.6.1

That's all the changes that happened, here are the source and deployment files:

nGalleryTNG2_ProjectFiles.zip (2.95 MB)
nGalleryTNG2_WebFiles.zip (1.03 MB)

Categories: .NET | ASP.NET | Use the source Luke
Thursday, 13 December 2007 11:42:52 (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [4]

 



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