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nGallery Updated For ASP.NET 2.0
Advanced Code Access Security
SharpDevelop2 2.1 Beta 1
SharpDevelop2 2.0 Final Hits the (Virtual) Streets
Talk Resources: ASP.NET Build Provider
Enterprise Library 2.0 Hands On Labs
THE Authoritative Article on NGen
Professional ASP.NET 2.0 Security, Membership, and Role Management
Ready to Rock the Launch
ImageCache, Take One
Windows Workflow Foundation Beta 1.2
Google PageRank as a .NET Assembly
Next Week: ADC 2005 - Advanced Developers Conference
Fun with ASP.NET 2.0 Compilation
Issue Identified: Crashing Visual Studio 2005 for Fun
Code Converter for .NET 2.0 - Online, as well as Offline
Convert C# 2.0 Code to VB.NET 8.0
Crashing Visual Studio 2005 for fun
ASP.NET 2.0 Hosting Deployment Guide
Web Deployment Projects
Windows Server Codename Longhorn, Visual Studio 2005 Team System Beta 2, LINQ & Atlas
PDC05: Day Three, WE-SYP
PDC05: Day One in Review
Webcast on MSBuild for Visual Studio 2005 Team Systems Beta Experience
ASP.NET 2.0 Security Practices at a Glance
Browse with... in Visual Studio 2005
Setting the port for the Visual Web Developer Web Server
Webcast on Profiling for Visual Studio 2005 Team Systems Beta Experience
Watch the ASP.NET 2.0 Presentations from TechEd 2005
Using Custom Attributes in the @Page Directive
Community-driven Security Conference in Vienna, Austria
Provider Toolkit
#d^3 coming to a close
Localization and the ASP.NET 2.0 Profile
Membership Everywhere
Writing a Subversion-backed VirtualPathProvider for ASP.NET 2.0
Callbacks in ASP.NET 2.0
Adding auditing capabilities to SqlMembershipProvider
WEB428 @ TechEd Europe 2005
Using ASP.NET 2.0 authentication with a Classic ASP site
Community Bootcamp 2005 Fully Booked
VSTO 2005 is Cool
http://beta.asp.net Launch
Beta 2 Code Updates for "Introduction to ASP.NET 2.0"
Ultimately cool: ASP.NET Development Helper
Best new friend: Format Document
SQL Server 2005 April CTP
Go-Live License
Visual Studio 2005 Team Foundation Server Beta 2 Installation Guide
February CTP now available
HttpOnly Cookies with ASP.NET 2.0
The AutoCompleteType Property
ASP.NET 2.0 Training
Currently downloading: Exploring ASP.NET 2.0 Using Visual C# 2005
Conference Preparation
Team Foundation Installation Guide for December CTP
Generics – Misconceptions Abound
ASP.NET 2.0 product design changes between Beta 1 and Beta 2
Visual Studio 2005 Team System Presentation Slides
MSDN TV: Introducing Visual Basic Express
MSDN TV: New Visual Studio Tools Features for Web Developers
Beta 2 Special Directory Names Changes
Visual Studio 2005 Beta 1 Refresh with Visual Studio 2005 Team System
C5 - A library of generic collections
Upcoming Changes to ASP.NET 2.0 in Beta 2
Book: Introducing Microsoft ASP.NET 2.0
Visual Studio 2005 Team System Pre-Release Walkthrough Projects
Video Interview on Burton
CLR Managed Debugger Sample
Script Callbacks in ASP.NET
Parsing or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love TryParse
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#  Friday, 30 November 2007

I have posted an updated version

Given my plans to rather sooner than later upgrade my server to IIS7, I am currently switching all applications to ASP.NET 2.0 in preparation of this move. But there was nGallery, which I used all over the place when I needed a photo gallery...

Today I decided it was about time to do something about it, and gave converting nGallery to .NET 2.0 a try (actually all the projects target .NET Framework 3.5). Turns out it took me roundabout two hours for this whole endeavour. To save everybody else time, here is my VS2008 solution tree:

nGalleryTNG.zip (2.92 MB)

What is changed compared to the original nGallery 1.6.1 for ASP.NET 1.1? Here is a somewhat complete laundry list:

  • Converted it to a Web Application project
  • Placed all third party source code in the ThirdParty folder. That way I can always change and recompile if necessary.
  • Took all static images from the \photos directories and put them into \images. No more mixing the photo handler & photo cache with the Web site's images.
  • The album handler is now being abused in Application_BeginRequest, plus it now uses RewritePath. Fixes the darn Server.Transfer errors.
  • Moved the configuration of nGallery from the data folder to App_Data. Other than that: no configuration changes.

I did not switch to ASP.NET 2.0 master pages, it still uses the old user control approach. But after all, I only needed it in a working fashion for 2.0+.

Note: I only tested the XML-based storage because that's how I use nGallery. The SQL-storage has received no testing whatsoever!

Download Web site files only: nGalleryTNG_WebSite.zip (924.39 KB)

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | 3.5 | ASP.NET | Use the source Luke
Friday, 30 November 2007 15:07:36 (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [11]

 



#  Monday, 30 October 2006

Last Tuesday, I held the talk "Advanced Code Access Security" at UG Styria in Graz. This talk was originally part of the MSDN Security Briefings held in Austria earlier this year, for which MS Austria had asked MVPs to help create and deliver security content. Advanced CAS seemed an interesting enough developer topic to re-run at user groups, and Mario (the author of this session) has allowed me to publish the slide deck and demos for the general public.

AdvancedCodeAccessSecurity.pdf (4542 KB)

AdvancedCAS.zip (599.6 KB)

Please note that I have published only demos four (setting CAS via setup) and six (using CAS in addin application) - those are the "completed" versions of the demos.

Categories: .NET | 2 Ohhhh | Community | Cool Download | Security | this
Monday, 30 October 2006 09:10:54 (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Tuesday, 19 September 2006

Beta 1 of SharpDevelop2 2.1 is available for download. While I was putting together the annoucement for v2.1 yesterday, I realized that for a point release, we really managed to put in a lot of new cool features:

A couple of WOW features (for me, at least): Not only can you compile an application for different versions of .NET, you also get version-specific code completion support. Another cool one is that you can host SharpDevelop in your application, providing your application a "macro editor" (on steroids I might add) with full .NET support. And to pick a third, code analysis rounds out our professional offering in addition to code coverage as well as unit testing.

Two features did not make it for the Beta 1 announcement as they don't yet cover all the scenarios we are hoping for: integrated Subversion support (yeah!) and targetting the Compact Framework for Windows CE devices. Those slipped silently into this release.

As you can see, SharpDevelop is ever growing and the developers working on it can be rightly proud of their achievements!

Finally, a kind of "call to action": let us know what you think! Not only in our forums, but also in your blogs, communities, et cetera. We need your feedback regarding feature set, stability, and much more.

Categories: .NET | 2 Ohhhh | C# | Cool Download | Subversion | this | Use the source Luke
Tuesday, 19 September 2006 12:10:55 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Monday, 17 July 2006

Disclaimer: I am the PM for the #develop project.

After almost two years in development, the #develop team has shipped version 2.0 of its open source integrated development environment (IDE) SharpDevelop2. The new version supports the .sln / .*proj project file formats of Visual Studio 2005, therefore you can open and edit existing projects inside SharpDevelop2. The team however does not view SharpDevelop2 as a competitor for the Express line of products (comparison) from Microsoft, but it aims at software developers that need best of breed tools for their software development process - like unit testing, code coverage, documentation generation and more. In the same vein, version 2.1 will complement those existing features with integrated source code control, code analysis tools as well component testing.

SharpDevelop2 is especially well-suited for developers that chose the Boo language, because SharpDevelop2 offers first-class support for code completion as well as the Windows Forms designer. Aside from this unique selling point there a couple of smaller but nonetheless productivity-enhancing features in version 2.0: code conversion (eg VB.NET to C#, but see for yourself), support for Mono, documentation preview, RegEx compilation und quite a few more.

A lot of the features are owed to the ease of integration and extensibility provided by the addin system found in SharpDevelop2. This addin system can be used by developers in their own application - this being the reason for the rather unconventional license choice for SharpDevelop2: LGPL instead of GPL, which is much more common for development tools such as #develop. Re-use by third parties has been the driving factor to change the license.

Thanks to all the contributors that made SharpDevelop2 a reality, especially the technical lead on the 2.x effort, Daniel Grunwald.

Categories: .NET | 2 Ohhhh | Cool Download | Newsbites | this | Use the source Luke
Monday, 17 July 2006 15:07:33 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Tuesday, 20 June 2006

As promised, here is the list of links / articles / samples that I used for preparing my talk "Build Provider in ASP.NET 2.0":

Hope you will find those useful.

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET | this | Training and Conferences
Tuesday, 20 June 2006 13:14:32 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Thursday, 04 May 2006

Six labs, both available in C# and VB.NET. Download (nuff said)

Categories: .NET | 2 Ohhhh | Cool Download
Thursday, 04 May 2006 10:20:36 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Thursday, 13 April 2006

If you ever consider using NGen with your .NET applications, then you simply MUST read the article The Performance Benefits of NGen in the current issue of MSDN Magazine. It can't get any more authoritative than that (the author Surupa Biswas works on the runtime's back-end compiler and focuses primarily on pre-compilation technologies).

Categories: .NET | 2 Ohhhh
Thursday, 13 April 2006 16:17:29 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Sunday, 19 February 2006

On my flight to Seattle today (or yesterday, depending on the time zone) I started to read Professional ASP.NET 2.0 Security, Membership, and Role Management by Stefan Schackow. The book definitely is a must-have for every ASP.NET developer, even if you decide to read one chapter only: A Matter of Trust (#3). This one will save you loads of time when you have to deploy an application into non-full trust environments. However, the other chapters are worthwhile too, like #2 which details exactly which identity is used when by what part of the engine. Bottomline: highly recommended reading.

Categories: .NET | 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET | Books | Security
Sunday, 19 February 2006 09:21:00 (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Monday, 06 February 2006

Will be there Wednesday & Thursday as ATE (Ask the Experts), so drop by in the experts zone and say hello!

Monday, 06 February 2006 14:56:39 (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Wednesday, 18 January 2006

Yesterday, I picked up on an old code piece of mine - sending images to the client via an HttpHandler. Why in the world would you implement that with a handler when there is http.sys kernel mode caching? Well, I had a few unique constraints:

  • the images had to live outside the Web root and any of its vroots
  • the image names had to be concealed because the naming would give away information, and renaming the images prior to publishing on the Web was out of the question

Now, a common approach to sending images from a certain directory (leaving requirement #2 by the wayside for the moment) would be this:

image.aspx?image=iamthebest.jpg

So what is wrong with this approach? First and foremost using an ASP.NET page. The page lifecycle is a drain on performance and throughput, because you simply don't need it. That sorts out why I chose to go with an HTTP handler.

Secondly, somebody could DOS your server. You heard me right. For the background, check the article Trap Alert: Files that aren't. A .NET version (managed C++) of this checker can be found in this download (the article Dateityp-Ermittlung in Managed C++ is only available in German).

How do you get around this issue? Well, how about reading the directory up front, and instead of having the filename in the URL, send the hash! When the image is requested, take the hash and look up the corresponding file, presto. In addition you get one security feature for free: no directory traversals can be hidden in your code.

When I uncovered the code yesterday, I decided to rewrite it for more general use. So what do you get?

  • The ImageCacheControls project: it contains the ImageCache class, which does most of the heavy lifting. In addition, you get an ImageCacheControl server control, as well as the implementation of the HTTP handler. (Don't forget to check out the Readme.txt for the latest on feature set and known issues)
  • The Web project: a rather simple Web site with demo files in it. The file I want to direct your attention to is Image.ashx. This is the one file - aside from the control project binaries - that needs to be copied to your projects to get started with ImageCache. Note that I made it easy to work with C# (default) or VB.NET.

Usage of ImageCache is demonstrated in default.aspx.cs plus the source code of default.aspx (design time of the control does not work, known issue).

The code behind looks like this (CreateMapping loads the directory contents, initializes the hash to file name map, stores it into the cache):

using ChrisOnNET.ImageCache;

public partial class _Default : System.Web.UI.Page
{
   protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
   {
      // normally, this would be done in global.asax
      ImageCache.CreateMapping("demo", Server.MapPath("~/TestImages/"));

      // the DIY approach to rendering the image tag
      string testHash = ImageCache.GetHashForFile("026.jpg", "demo");
      Response.Write("<image src=\"Image.ashx?bucket=" +
         "demo" +
         "&image=" +
         Server.UrlEncode(testHash) +
         "\" />");

      // the elegant approach to rendering the image tag
      Response.Write("<image src=\"" + ImageCache.GenerateUrl("036.jpg", "demo") +
      "\" />");

      // see HTML source for server control approach (Design time not working, known issue)
   }
}

Rendering Image tags in Page_Load isn't nice, but after all it is only intended to show the functionality. Most likely you are going to use the declarative ImageCacheControl anyways:

<%@ Page Language="C#" AutoEventWireup="true"  CodeFile="Default.aspx.cs" Inherits="_Default" %>
<%@ Register Assembly="ImageCacheControls" Namespace="ChrisOnNET.ImageCache" TagPrefix="cc1" %>
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" >
<head runat="server">
    <title>Untitled Page</title>
</head>
<body>
    <form id="form1" runat="server">
    <div>
        <br />Using the ImageCacheControl:&nbsp;
        <cc1:ImageCacheControl ID="ImageCacheControl1"
            Bucket="demo"
            FileName="026.jpg"
            runat="server" />
    </div>
    </form>
</body>
</html>

That's basically it. Let me know what you think.

ImageCacheTakeOne.zip (59.55 KB)

Categories: .NET | 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET | Use the source Luke
Wednesday, 18 January 2006 11:21:05 (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Saturday, 14 January 2006

New runtime components are available which are compatible with the release versions of .NET Framework 2.0, Visual Studio 2005, as well as Office "12" Beta 1 (which I don't have anyways).

Categories: .NET | 2 Ohhhh | Cool Download | Visual Studio
Saturday, 14 January 2006 10:31:23 (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [3]

 



#  Monday, 05 December 2005

Today, a member of our German .NET community asked if it is possible to programmatically query the Google page rank. He had seen it done in PHP (here on the Google Community site), but didn't have time / PHP skills to translate it. All I found on a rather shallow search was PullRank, which I'd describe as non-fit for server use.

So I decided to set out to convert the PHP sample. Being PHP-challenged myself, I decided to give the PHP to ASP.NET Migration Assistant a shot. Whoha! That converted code is the most convoluted contraption to be called code I have seen - ever. I tried to get it to run, but failed because the conversion left me with some loose ends.

Instead of giving in, I contacted Christian Wenz to lend me a hand because he has some PHP experience. He thankfully hosted an "annotated" version of the PHP script so I could look at the output of various stages to test my solution with known-good values. That was most helpful.

Instead of doing a Web site demo application with everything intertwined, I split up the project into two - GPRDotNet being a DLL assembly project you can reference in any type of .NET application (Windows Forms, Web Forms, you name it), as well as a simple Web frontend to demo the usage: DemoSite.

Querying the page rank is really simple - the following snippet is the code from the "Check PageRank" button event handler:

protected void doCheckPageRank_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  GooglePageRank pr = new GooglePageRank();

  string url = webSiteUrl.Text;

  try
  {
    string rank = pr.GetRank(url);
    thePageRank.Text = rank;
  }
  catch (Exception ex)
  {
    // this is rather chatty (telling the end user everything *IS* a bad idea)
    thePageRank.Text = "Requesting the page rank failed. Reason: " + ex.ToString();
  }
}

I want to emphasize that the code for the GooglePageRank class is a rather quick & dirty port of the PHP code and that it does not contain the necessary error handling you would expect for a server-side library. After all, it is just a proof of concept for our community.

Finally, here is the source code: PageRank.zip (26.89 KB)

If you find errors, please leave a blog comment so others know about improvements. Thanks!

Categories: .NET | 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET | C# | Community | this | Use the source Luke
Monday, 05 December 2005 19:03:00 (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [1]

 



#  Sunday, 27 November 2005

Next week, I will be in Rosenheim, Germany for the ADC 2005. I'll be teaching the Visual Studio 2005 Team System Hands-on workshop (Tuesday as well as Friday), plus doing two talks during the main conference: IIS 7 and ASP.NET 2.0 Health Monitoring. See you there!

Sunday, 27 November 2005 23:01:00 (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Monday, 14 November 2005

You need: Visual Studio 2005, IIS 6.0 and Visual Studio 2005 Web Deployment Projects (Beta Preview). Of course, the .NET Framework 2.0 should be installed.

The site has one simple page: Convert.aspx (C#, separate code file):

As you can see, this page is being run with the ASP.NET Development Web Server. Also works fine with IIS 6.0.

Next, let's add a deployment project to our Web project:

Build it, and in IIS, create a new application and map it to the Debug directory. Execute the page:

Oopsie, what the hell happened here? The answer can be found by digging into the Temporary ASP.NET Files directory:

Let's have a look at the generated vs precompiled assemblies in ILDasm:

So what's the difference? Well, it happens that by default on-demand compilation and precompilation behave differently in the way the pages (page classes) are stitched together. In one case we have a quasi-random name, and in the other we have the class name as it was set in our Convert.aspx - Convert. And this rather obviously clashes with System.Convert (I have a certain talent on picking about the single problematic name).

Why is the Convert name retained? Look in Property Tabs for the deployment project:

By default "Allow this precompiled site to be updatable" is checked - which after all is very useful. But not in this specific case where my Convert class clashes with System.Convert...

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET | Visual Studio
Monday, 14 November 2005 14:59:58 (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0]

 

In my blog entry Crashing Visual Studio 2005 for Fun I described how to crash Visual Studio 2005. Scott Guthrie followed up, and since then I was in permanent contact with team members. After some research, it turned out that it (a) was seemingly reproducible only on my machine, and (b) likely a tooltip issue.

What is going? Well, my machine is equipped with a Matrox P750 and has three monitors attached, spanning a single 3840x1024 "display". This strechted single display is managed by Matrox PowerDesk-HF, and it comes with a couple of desktop settings to make applications play nice on three physical monitors. One of those options is "Prevent tooltip spanning in strechted mode":

What does this option do? Imagine that I have an application full screen on the middle monitor - without that option turned on, tooltips "overflow" to the monitor to the right (you only see the background image in this screenshot, but that is the 3rd monitor):

Now guess what - once I turn that option on, VS05 crashes the way I described in my previous blog entry. It took me a couple of reboots, configuration from scratch and quite some testing to finally figure out the root cause for this crash.

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET | this | Visual Studio
Monday, 14 November 2005 13:23:40 (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [2]

 



#  Sunday, 13 November 2005

This week I got started and I implemented a C# to VB.NET conversion. Today, I added VB.NET to C#, as well as C# / VB.NET to Boo. You can find the new converter at this URL:

http://developer.sharpdevelop.net/codeconvert.net/

In addition to the "usual" Web interface, I also added a Web Service. This enables you to remotely exploit the code conversion features of #develop. For example, in a Windows Forms application:

It behaves exactly the same way as the online converter. To get you started, the following download contains both the executable (in the bin/release folder) as well as the source code for the application shown in this screenshot. Have fun, and please don't forget to report conversion errors so we can improve the underlying NRefactory!

CodeConvertServiceClient.zip (38.57 KB)

Sunday, 13 November 2005 21:11:00 (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [1]

 



#  Thursday, 10 November 2005

I just finished a Web-based C# to VB.NET converter for .NET 2.0. It took me about half an hour and 20 lines of code. How come? Well, Daniel (#develop 2.0 PM) did a video on NRefactory, which is at the heart of #develop's parsing infrastructure. I took some of his demo code plus some of #develop's internal code converter, and put it into a ASP.NET 2.0 page. Presto, that easy if you can stand on the shoulders of giants.

Oh, and I actually put it online, here is the link: C# to VB.NET converter (you can find the source code for a simpler VB.NET implementation of the converter here).

Categories: .NET | 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET | C#
Thursday, 10 November 2005 20:22:24 (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Tuesday, 08 November 2005

Now, I did not set out to crash it intentionally, but at least it is fully reproducible. What did I do? Well, I wanted to build a site based on the code I wrote in the blog entry Writing a Subversion-backed VirtualPathProvider for ASP.NET 2.0. So I created a new directory for the site, and simply put the code from the download into a subdirectory (which already exists in the zip file):

Of course I went ahead and opened MyNewWebSite in Visual Studio 2005:

Nothing unexpected so far, I can expand all directories just fine in Solution Explorer:

However, as soon as I hover over SubversionVirtualPathProvider.cs, Solution Explorer goes grey. Totally grey. As in no icons, no tree, no nothing. So I File / Exit Visual Studio 2005 (saying No to saving the solution), and kabooom, here is my friend the error reporting tool:

Oh, and btw, an empty App_Code directory won't do the trick.

Categories: .NET | 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET | Visual Studio
Tuesday, 08 November 2005 16:23:13 (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [1]

 



#  Sunday, 16 October 2005

The ASP.NET 2.0 Deployment Guide is a reference for web hosters who are interested in adding ASP.NET 2.0 to their existing Windows hosting service. Besides improving developer productivity, ASP.NET 2.0 also provides benefits for hosted environments, including support for shutting down inactive applications and locking down rogue applications. Enhanced health monitoring configuration can be used to set thresholds and severity levels for monitoring the health of ASP.NET.

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET
Sunday, 16 October 2005 13:20:38 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Wednesday, 05 October 2005

You only have to wait till the others do all the typing: Paul and Plip are writing about the Web Deployment Projects feature that we were shown today at the AspInsiders summit. Cool stuff that should be in the hands of everybody by the time VS05 launches.

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET | Visual Studio
Wednesday, 05 October 2005 22:13:13 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Sunday, 25 September 2005

I already have one box (the Shuttle XPC) that is running Windows Server Codename Longhorn Build 5219. Because it wasn't all that much of a hassle when compared to Beta 1 of Windows Vista, I decided to set up Longhorn on my laptop - and try to work with that installation for a week, while I am in Seattle for the MVP & AspInsiders summits. Boy did I end up with an installation marathon...

Lessons learned in this Sunday's "don't try this at home kids" department:

  • Don't assume that ATI drivers for your IBM X31 will install on Longhorn. They refuse, making for rather crappy UI performance. By the way, on failing, setup suggests to install a VGA driver first.
  • None of the network adapters were found - neither the onboard LAN, nor the onboard WLAN. When you peek into Computer Mangement, it is your guess which of the two "Ethernet Controller" is which.
  • Don't only update the driver for one, even if it is the LAN one. Your ISA 2004 client installation will mysteriously fail. After installing drivers for all LAN equipement, it just works.
  • Minor annoyance: the OS-provided sound driver produces hisses et al. Not too bad, but annoying if you plan to watch loads of Channel 9 movies. Your guess is correct: the vendor-provided driver refuses to install.
  • No standby. That sucks royally.
  • You learned about that in my previous post - no .NET 1.1 for you by default.
  • Installing VS can be so much fun, especially if MSXML 6.0 refuses to install as part of the default install. Doing it separately works so much better. And the "Locate File" dialog for the VM driver irritated me only for the better part of a minute...
  • Before installing the Atlas VSIs, you better start VS at least once. Otherwise the Atlas installation will fail. Only mildly interesting.
  • Do I need to mention that Virtual PC networking doesn't work? That one didn't change for the better, which will make me dual boot into XP.

On a different note: default installs of 5219 have a blank password for Administrator. And IIS 7 is installed by default, which really baffled me. I'm so trained to enable features after install that at first I was thinking it was not part of the bits I got...

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET | C# | IIS | Longhorn | Team System | this | Visual Studio
Sunday, 25 September 2005 22:25:57 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Friday, 16 September 2005

The day started out with one of those famous spoof videos - this time about a "variation" of Windows error reporting, dubbed WE-SYP (we share your pain). Error reporting tied to a - let's call it - "multimedia" chair. Fun to watch.

Right after that, Bob Muglia showed off what we can expect from Windows Server in the next couple of year. Windows Server 2003 Compute Cluster Solution was demoed together with Excel Services - impressive. TxF (transactional NTFS) wasn't any less exciting, just like the identity solutions - and, of course, IIS 7.0. We got the bits for the latter today. 

Sessions I attended today:

  • Windows Communications Foundation ("Indigo"): A Deep Dive into Best Practices Using the Windows Communications Foundation
  • ASP.NET: Future Directions for Developing Rich Web Applications with Atlas (Part 2)
  • ASP.NET: A Sneak Peek at Future Directions in Web Development and Designer Tools
  • Windows Vista & "Longhorn" Server: Under the Hood of the Operating System—System Internals and Your Application
  • ASP.NET: Deep Dive into the ObjectDataSource Control

The under the hood session for Longhorn server had one interesting tidbit - they aim to require mandatory signing for kernel mode drivers on x64 platforms - bye bye kernel root kits!

Bradley Millington quite overshot his allocated timeslot for the ObjectDataSource control, but he covered interesting areas: filtering and master details, custom sorting and paging, updates inserts deletes as well as transactions and caching. Seeing realistic examples is a welcome change. A good place for you to start: the Advanced Data Scenarios section of the Quickstarts. (Note: those links point to http://beta.asp.net, and I don't think that Whidbey docs will be up and running there forever, given that "Orcas" starts appearing on the horizon).

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET | IIS | Security | this | Training and Conferences
Friday, 16 September 2005 05:20:36 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Tuesday, 13 September 2005

The PDC today officially kicked off with a keynote by Bill Gates. To me, the more interesting parts came later in Jim Allchins keynote: Atlas, Windows Communication Foundation, Windows Presentation Foundation as well as C# 3.0 & LINQ. However, Office 12 does look very promising too. Can't wait to get my hands on that beta (never expected to say that about Office, ever).

In the afternoon, I attended the following breakouts:

  • Behind the Scenes of Visual Studio 2005 Team Foundation Server
  • Windows Server “Longhorn”: What's New for Developers
  • Windows Presentation Foundation ("Avalon"): A Lap around the Windows Presentation Foundation

Looking forward to tomorrow, because Windows Workflow Foundation will be revealed at the keynote (aka general session).

 

Categories: .NET | 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET | C# | Team System | this | Training and Conferences | Visual Studio
Tuesday, 13 September 2005 04:33:11 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Tuesday, 16 August 2005

I promised two things during today's webcast The build system of Visual Studio Team System: links to get started with MSBuild as well as the samples I presented. Let's get started with the easy part, the samples:

VS05BetaExperienceWebcastMSBuildSamples.zip

And here are some useful links for your start into MSBuild:

That's it. You might also want to check out my link list for last week's webcast, Profiling for Visual Studio 2005 Team Systems Beta Experience.

Tuesday, 16 August 2005 15:26:20 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 

From the summary of this security practice: This module presents a set of consolidated practices designed to address ASP.NET version 2.0 security issues. The answers and recommendations presented in this module are tight distillations designed to supplement the companion modules and additional guidance. The practices are organized by various categories that represent those areas where mistakes are most often made.

Security Practices: ASP.NET 2.0 Security Practices at a Glance

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET | Security
Tuesday, 16 August 2005 10:01:40 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Wednesday, 10 August 2005

Want to test your Web site with that other browser? You know, the one that ships with the operating system? Here is how to do that. Start by right-clicking on the page you want to open:

In the Browse With dialog box, you can now choose which browser to use this time only, or by clicking Set as Default, use it for all your future Ctrl+F5 endeavours:

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET | Visual Studio
Wednesday, 10 August 2005 14:37:17 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 

Sometimes, it might be handy to not have VS.NET pick a dynamic port each and every time it starts Visual Web Developer Web Server (aka ASP.NET Development Server or, as it was called back in the old days, Cassini). There is an easy way to get a fixed port when you press Ctrl+F5. First step is to select the Web project in Solution Explorer:

Next, go to the Properties window (DO NOT right-click and choose Property Pages - you will end up somewhere entirely different):

As you can see, I already switched "Use dynamic ports" to False, and in this case, I chose to stick with the default provided port number. When is this port-setting useful? When you automate tests, for example.

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET | Visual Studio
Wednesday, 10 August 2005 14:27:43 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Tuesday, 09 August 2005

Just minutes ago, I finished my Webcast on Profiling with Visual Studio Team System, which is one in a series of Webcasts for MSDN Connection Service: Visual Studio 2005 Team Systems Beta Experience (MSDN Deutschland). As promised, here is a list of links that prove to be invaluable when navigating the "bits":

That should get you started with profiling. Next week's topic is "The build system of Visual Studio Team System".

Tuesday, 09 August 2005 15:21:20 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Monday, 08 August 2005
Go here, and download samples, slides, and for almost all sessions, actually watch it! Especially interesting might be this one here: WEB340 IIS7: Discover and Move to the Next Generation Web Application Server Platform.
Monday, 08 August 2005 19:02:29 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Wednesday, 03 August 2005
Scott Guthrie has written a blog entry about how to make this happen. Really, really easy to do.
Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET
Wednesday, 03 August 2005 09:50:14 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Tuesday, 02 August 2005

On 12th of August, the Austrian .NET community is hosting a one-day conference on security, targeted at developers (no surprise here). The topics for NCC 2005 A include:

  • Threat Modeling
  • What's new in .NET 2.0 Security
  • What's new in SQL Server 2005 Security
  • What's new in Windows Vista Security

Quite a nice line-up I'd say. This event is supported by Microsoft Austria, so attending this event is free, except for your time, but I am sure security does warrant a day of your time! Sign up here

Tuesday, 02 August 2005 15:27:45 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 

The Microsoft ASP.NET Developer Center has the Provider Toolkit online. It sports the Access Provider as a C# class library project for download!
Tuesday, 02 August 2005 11:46:18 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Sunday, 31 July 2005

I spent this weekend in Bad Ischl together with other members of the #develop open source project. This was the first get-together under the "#develop developer days" umbrella, and most of the core team was able to attend the two-and-a-half day event.

Our focus was to talk about #develop 2.0 "Corsavy", feature-set wise as well as hashing out architectural issues not addressed yet. Aside from that, coding was the #1 priority: to tackle a couple of outstanding issues, such as Forms Designer or Refactoring support. Spending time in one room makes communication so much easier when you have to solve tricky issues that span multiple modules in our infrastructure. It definitely paid off to spend this weekend together.

Categories: .NET | 2 Ohhhh | this | Use the source Luke
Sunday, 31 July 2005 16:45:03 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Friday, 29 July 2005

One thing I didn't get around to demo at last week's CBC05 is the usage of profiles to remember and subsequently set the culture on ASP.NET pages. That's why I am documenting it now.

To get started, we need to have a profile that stores the user's preferred culture. So your profile in web.config looks could like this:

    <profile enabled="true" defaultProvider="myProfile">
      <providers>
        <add name="myProfile"
          type="System.Web.Profile.SqlProfileProvider"
          connectionStringName="NWConn"/>
      </providers>
      <properties>
        <add name="Culture" type="String" defaultValue="en-US" />
        <add name="Theme" type="String" />
      </properties>
    </profile>

The Culture profile setting is changed via a simple (hard-coded) dropdown list in default.aspx, which also displays a greeting pulled from a localized global resource, the culture code for verification purposes, as well as the current time formatted according to the respective locale:

The code for the button in default.aspx.cs is rather basic as you would have expected:

protected void Button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
   Profile.Culture = DropDownList1.SelectedValue;

   // really nasty redirect to go back to this back and see the effect
   Response.Redirect(Request.Path + "?" + Server.UrlEncode(DateTime.Now.ToLongTimeString()));
}

The real magic for setting the culture so that formatting is done correctly, as well as the right resources being displayed, is done in a custom HttpModule, which needs to be registered in web.config:

    <httpModules>
      <add name="myProfileModule" type="ICSharpCode.Web.ApplyProfileToPageModule" />
    </httpModules>

This guy lives in App_Code\ApplyProfileToPageModule.cs, and looks like this:

using System;
using System.Configuration;
using System.Web;
using System.Web.Security;
using System.Web.UI;
using System.Web.UI.WebControls;
using System.Web.UI.HtmlControls;
using System.Threading;
using System.Globalization;

namespace ICSharpCode.Web
{
 public class ApplyProfileToPageModule : IHttpModule
 {
  public void Dispose()
  {
   // currently, does nothing
  }

  public void Init(HttpApplication context)
  {
    context.PreRequestHandlerExecute += AppPreRequestHandlerExecute;
  }

  private void AppPreRequestHandlerExecute(object sender, EventArgs e)
  {
   Page p = HttpContext.Current.Handler as Page;

   if (null != p)
   {
      ProfileCommon pc = (ProfileCommon)HttpContext.Current.Profile;

      string cultureName = pc.Culture;

      CultureInfo culture = new CultureInfo(cultureName);

      Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentUICulture = culture;
      Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture = culture;

      // You can set the Theme exactly the same way, shown below:
      // p.Theme = pc.Theme;
   }
  }
 }
}

In PreRequestHandlerExecute, I can access the profile, and go ahead and read the culture that is defined. Then all you need to do is set the CurrentUICulture as well as CurrentCulture of the CurrentThread. Done.

By the way, this event is also your ticket to set the Theme for a Page - if you have defined the user's preferred theme in her profile. Neat way of doing this.

LocalizationModule.zip (6.09 KB)

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET
Friday, 29 July 2005 11:00:03 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [2]

 



#  Thursday, 28 July 2005

Did you know that the Membership API isn't limited to being used inside ASP.NET 2.0 applications? That you can also use it in say a Console application? This is actually very useful, because that spells automated administration for me.

In order to demo this, I set out and created a very simple Web application that lists users registered with the Membership system:

This simply calls Membership.GetAllUsers() and we are set. More interesting is web.config (partial view):

  <connectionStrings>
    <add name="NWConn"
connectionString="Data Source=cbc05vpc\cbc05;Initial Catalog=Northwind;User=sa;Password=P@ssw0rd"/>
  </connectionStrings>
  <system.web>
    <membership defaultProvider="myMembership">
      <providers>
        <clear/>
        <add name="myMembership"
          applicationName="DemoApp"
          connectionStringName="NWConn"
          type="System.Web.Security.SqlMembershipProvider, System.Web, Version=2.0.0.0, ..." />
      </providers>
    </membership>

This is using the stock SqlMembershipProvider, and stores data inside the Northwind database. Pretty vanilla, except for one important attribute: applicationName. Because one Membership database can hold accounts for multiple applications, we need to define the name here unless we want to end up with guessing that name for the console application.

Now let's switch to the Console application. It obviously needs to reference System.Web.dll:

Secondly, it needs an App.Config file (this time, in full glory):

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<configuration>
  <connectionStrings>
    <add
      name="NWConn" connectionString="Data Source=cbc05vpc\cbc05;Initial Catalog=Northwind;User=sa;Password=P@ssw0rd"/>
  </connectionStrings>
  <system.web>
    <membership defaultProvider="myMembership">
      <providers>
        <clear/>
        <add name="myMembership"
           applicationName="DemoApp"
           connectionStringName="NWConn"
           type="System.Web.Security.SqlMembershipProvider, System.Web, ..." />
      </providers>
    </membership>
  </system.web>
</configuration>

As you can see, I simply copied its contents verbatim from the previously shown web.config. All we now need is to access the Membership API inside our application:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;
using System.Web.Security;

namespace TheConsoleApp
{
 class Program
 {
   static void Main(string[] args)
   {
     MembershipUserCollection muc = Membership.GetAllUsers();
     foreach (MembershipUser mu in muc)
      Console.WriteLine(mu.UserName + " " + mu.Email);
   }
 }
}

Surprise, surprise - it works as expected:

Done.

MembershipEverywhere.zip (19.28 KB)

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET
Thursday, 28 July 2005 14:27:21 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [2]

 



#  Wednesday, 27 July 2005

This post is again motivated by last week's Community Bootcamp on ASP.NET 2.0, the CBC05. I presented "Under the Covers - Exploring Internals, Page Lifecycle and the Compilation Mode" from TechEd, using the samples that Simon Calvert provided me with (special thanks fly out to Simon, Ben Miller and Rich Ersek @MS for providing us with material - I know I can be a royal pain in the posterior... sometimes at least).

The talk included a demo of a database-backed virtual path provider (files don't come from the file system but a database, dynamically). Somehow we started talking about how cool it would be if you could test your Web sites without checking them out from source control in the first place - by simply writing a virtual path provider that goes to the repository on demand. I wrote that idea down.

Actually, I didn't think I'd get around to doing that. But yesterday I decided to pester one of my devs on the #develop project, namely Daniel Grunwald. He has implemented the Subversion addin for our 2.0 version, so he had experience with NSvn, the managed API for talking to Subversion. I sent a stripped down version of the vpath provider to him, and asked him to replace database code with NSvn code where appropriate.

It didn't take long, and I had a command-line verified version back, and all I had to do was make sure that it works with ASP.NET 2.0. There were a few problems I ran into (like Subversion is case-sensitive and I didn't want that for the Web scenario). Some of the issues arose simply because client and Web developers have different backgrounds. Talk about path separators. Or directories where you have to drop assemblies.

Now, let's stop talking, let's take a look at the provider in action:

SvnVPathProvider.wmv (3.76 MB)

Want to get your hands on that DemoSiteSvn directory with the current rendition of the SubversionVirtualPathProvider? No problem, just a couple of notes up front on what you should be aware of:

  • Only file names are currently treated specially for casing. Ie directories still do react in a case sensitive way.
  • The file name cracking code needs to be reviewed. Currently, this is a quick hack.
  • appSettings need to be placed in a separate .config file. Reason is that web.config cannot be obtained via a VirtualPathProvider, and thus this file has to be checked out separately. And I don't want to get in the way of automating this by requiring entries in web.config.
  • Package it as an assembly, so only the \bin folder needs to be copied to get up and running.
  • The VirtualPathProvider requires (at the very least) anonymous access to the repository. Passing security tokens is not implemented.

With those notes out of the way, thanks fly out to the ASP.NET team for providing me with the sample of their virtual path provider in the first place. It has been a tremendous help to get this thing off the ground. And maybe in turn this sample will help others to get started:

SvnVppDemo.zip (972.37 KB)

Installation note: the two DLLs in the system32 folder need to be dropped in the respective folder of your system. Do not place them into \bin. Unless you want to get into trouble, that is.

What is left to say? Oh, the source code, of course! I thought you might be interested in reading it online instead of having to download an almost 1MB-size file first. Here it is (App_Code\SubversionVirtualPathProvider.cs):

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Collections;
using System.Globalization;
using System.Configuration;
using System.Text;
using System.Web;
using System.Web.Util;
using System.Web.Hosting;
using System.Web.Caching;
using NSvn.Core;
using NSvn.Common;

namespace ICSharpCode.Web.Providers
{
public class SubversionVirtualPathProvider : VirtualPathProvider
{
#region class HashCodeCombiner
internal sealed class HashCodeCombiner
        {
            // Start with a seed
            private long _combinedHash = 5381;
            
            internal void AddLong(long l)
            {
                _combinedHash = ((_combinedHash << 5) + _combinedHash) ^ l;
            }
            
            internal string CombinedHashString
            {
                get
                {
                    return _combinedHash.ToString("x", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
                }
            }
}
#endregion

#region class SubversionVirtualFile
internal class SubversionVirtualFile : VirtualFile
    {
        string fullPath;
        DirectoryEntry entry;
            
        public SubversionVirtualFile(string virtualPath, string fullPath, DirectoryEntry entry)
                : base(virtualPath)
        {
            this.fullPath = fullPath;
            this.entry = entry;
        }
            
        public override bool IsDirectory {
            get {
                return entry.NodeKind == NodeKind.Directory;
            }
        }
            
        public override Stream concat()
        {
            Client client = new Client();
            MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream();
            client.Cat(ms, fullPath, Revision.Head);

            // .Cat closes the stream, so we have to copy it
            MemoryStream ms2 = new MemoryStream(ms.GetBuffer());
            ms2.Position = 0;
            return ms2;
        }
}
#endregion

public static void AppInitialize()
    {
        SubversionVirtualPathProvider provider = new SubversionVirtualPathProvider();
        HostingEnvironment.RegisterVirtualPathProvider(provider);
    }
        
    string GetSvnFullpath(string virtualPath)
    {
        if (bool.Parse(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["svnvppStripVdir"]))
        {
            // this will break root Webs, StripVdir should be the default however
            int pos = virtualPath.IndexOf('/', 1);
            virtualPath = virtualPath.Substring(pos, virtualPath.Length - pos);
        }

        return ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["svnvppRepositoryUrl"]
            + virtualPath;
        }

    string GetSvnFullpath(string virtualPath, string fileName)
    {
        return FixupSvnFullpath(GetSvnFullpath(virtualPath), fileName);
    }

    // Subversion is case sensitive, this we switch the filename here
    string FixupSvnFullpath(string svnPath, string fileName)
    {
        int pos = svnPath.LastIndexOf('/');
        string parentDirectory = svnPath.Substring(0, pos + 1);
        return parentDirectory + fileName;
    }
        
    DirectoryEntry GetEntry(string virtualPath)
    {
        Client svnClient = new Client();
        string fullPath = GetSvnFullpath(virtualPath);
        int pos = fullPath.LastIndexOf('/');
        string parentDirectory = fullPath.Substring(0, pos);
        string entryName = fullPath.Substring(pos + 1);

        try
        {
            DirectoryEntry[] entries = svnClient.List(parentDirectory, Revision.Head, false);
            foreach (DirectoryEntry entry in entries) 
            {   
                if (0 == String.Compare(entry.Path, entryName, true))
                        return entry;
            }

            return null;
        }
        catch (SvnClientException ex)
        {
            if (ex.ErrorCode == 160013) // parent directory not found
                return null;

            throw;
        }
    }
        
        public override bool FileExists(string virtualPath)
        {
            DirectoryEntry e = GetEntry(virtualPath);
            if (e != null)
                return e.NodeKind == NodeKind.File;

            return Previous.FileExists(virtualPath);
        }
        
        public override bool DirectoryExists(string virtualDir)
        {
            DirectoryEntry e = GetEntry(virtualDir);
            if (e != null)
                return e.NodeKind == NodeKind.Directory;
            return Previous.FileExists(virtualDir);
        }
        
        // Obtain the file. This will only be called if the hash that we return is
        // different than that the runtime holds on to as a cached indicator.
        public override VirtualFile GetFile(string virtualPath)
        {
            DirectoryEntry e = GetEntry(virtualPath);
            if (e != null)
                return new SubversionVirtualFile(virtualPath, GetSvnFullpath(virtualPath, e.Path), e);
            // Default to the previous implementation
            return Previous.GetFile(virtualPath);
        }
        
        /// ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
        /// Return a hash value indicating a key to test this file and dependencies have not been
        /// modified
        public override string GetFileHash(string virtualPath, IEnumerable virtualPathDependencies)
        {
            HashCodeCombiner hashCodeCombiner = new HashCodeCombiner();
            
            ArrayList unrecognizedDependencies = new ArrayList();
            
            foreach (string virtualDependency in virtualPathDependencies)
            {
                DirectoryEntry e = GetEntry(virtualDependency);
                if (e != null) {
                    hashCodeCombiner.AddLong(e.Size);
                    hashCodeCombiner.AddLong(e.CreatedRevision);
                } else {
                    unrecognizedDependencies.Add(unrecognizedDependencies);
                }
            }
            
            string result = hashCodeCombiner.CombinedHashString;
            
            if (unrecognizedDependencies.Count > 0)
            {
                result += Previous.GetFileHash(virtualPath, unrecognizedDependencies);
            }
            
            return result;
        }
        
        /// ///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
        /// The cache dependency is a specialized object that means that the runtime
        /// can perform file monitoring and change notifications directly
        public override CacheDependency GetCacheDependency(string virtualPath, IEnumerable virtualPathDependencies, DateTime utcStart)
        {
            // This VPP does not create CacheDependencies
            DirectoryEntry e = GetEntry(virtualPath);
            if (e != null)
                return null;
            
            return Previous.GetCacheDependency(virtualPath, virtualPathDependencies, utcStart);
        }
    }
}

 

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET | Community | Subversion
Wednesday, 27 July 2005 08:18:56 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Tuesday, 26 July 2005

Script Callbacks were also part of my "Advanced ASP.NET 2.0" day at the Community Bootcamp 2005 in Bad Ischl. Aside from showing the usual callback sample, I decided that something more useful was in order. That is why I went a tad further by showing off the controls introduced in the RefreshPanel GotDotNet workspace. I came across those a while back when reading articles on Bertrand Le Roy's blog:

Of course we did labs on CallbackProxy and RefreshPanel, the latter one is described in this blog entry (again, a streamlined version of the lab done by Alexander Schoeppl).

Let's start with the result we wanted to achieve:

The render date only acts as a "proof" that no Postback happened, the dropdown control lists all customers in Northwind and is also populated up front. The GridView control, however, is filled using out of band calls. Instead of hacking your own ugly JavaScript, we did that using the RefreshPanel control.

Step 1: Copy RefreshPanel.dll

First, copy RefreshPanel.dll to the \bin directory of your site. You can get it here.

Step 2: Set up a connection string in web.config

We will use that later both in markup and code beside file:

<connectionStrings>
 <add name="NorthwindConnectionString"
connectionString="Data Source=cbc05vpc\cbc05;Initial Catalog=Northwind;User=sa;Password=P@ssw0rd"/>
</connectionStrings>

Step 3: ShowCustomerOrders.aspx

Basically, "organized" in three sections (separated by a blank line):

<%@ Page Language="C#" AutoEventWireup="true" 
CodeFile="ShowCustomerOrders.aspx.cs" Inherits="Show_Customer_Orders"
Title="Callback Demo" %>
<%@ Register TagPrefix="rp" Namespace="MyControls.RefreshPanel"
Assembly="RefreshPanel" %>
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" >
<head runat="server">
    <title>Untitled Page</title>
</head>
<body>
    <form id="form1" runat="server">
    <div>
        Render Date: <asp:Literal ID="Literal1" runat="server"></asp:Literal>
        <br />
       
        <asp:DropDownList ID="DropDownList1" runat="server"
DataSourceID="SqlDataSource1" DataTextField="CustomerID"
DataValueField="CustomerID">
        </asp:DropDownList>
<asp:SqlDataSource ID="SqlDataSource1" runat="server"
ConnectionString="<%$ ConnectionStrings:NorthwindConnectionString %>"
            SelectCommand="SELECT [CustomerID] FROM [Customers]">
</asp:SqlDataSource>
        <rp:RefreshButton ID="MyButton" RefreshPanelID="RFPanel1"
            runat="server"
            ClientRefreshArgument="this.form.DropDownList1.options[this.form.DropDownList1.selectedIndex].value"
            Text="Show Orders"/>
        <br />
       
        <rp:RefreshPanel runat="server" ID="RFPanel1" OnRefreshing="FillData">
            <asp:GridView ID="GridView1" runat="server">
            </asp:GridView>
        </rp:RefreshPanel>
    </div>
    </form>
</body>
</html>

Register imports the RefreshPanel control suite for us, the Label and DropDown are also very straightforward. The RefreshPanel control itself contains a single GridView control, and it is linked to the server-side method FillData which we will examine in the next step. The RefreshButton is responsible for activating the out of band call back to the server - that's also where we get the value from the dropdown control, and pass it as an event argument to FillData.

Note that the control names are hardcoded, in the real world we'd build that string dynamically, because otherwise we'd get into trouble, eg with master pages.

Step 4: ShowCustomerOrders.aspx.cs

Page_Load is trivial, we are only interested in FillData:

public void FillData(object sender, RefreshingEventArgs e)
{
string connectionString = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["NorthwindConnectionString"].ToString();

string sqlCmd = "Select * from Orders where customerID = @CustomerID";

SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(connectionString);

SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand(sqlCmd, conn);
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@CustomerID", (string)e.EventArgument);

conn.Open();
SqlDataReader reader = cmd.ExecuteReader();

GridView1.DataSource = reader;
GridView1.DataBind();
reader.Close();
conn.Close();
}

No magic in our code, but: RefreshPanel takes care of giving us a GridView control to work with, and shipping the resulting HTML to the client - and inserting it into the page. Very, very neat indeed.

CallbackDemo.zip (43.51 KB)

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET | this | Training and Conferences
Tuesday, 26 July 2005 15:24:14 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Monday, 25 July 2005

On Friday, it was my turn as speaker at the Community Bootcamp 2005 aka CBC05. One of the topics at hand was "The Provider Model", with a focus on Membership providers. Those are the ones most likely being extended / written from scratch, and we did an exercise in that very area: Extend the SqlMembershipProvider to audit successful and failed logins similar to *nix. The solution I present today is a streamlined solution programmed by Alexander Schoeppl, one of the attendees.

Step 1: Create the table

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[myLoginAuditing](
 [username] [varchar](255) NOT NULL,
 [numberofSuccessfulLogins] [int] NOT NULL,
 [numberofFailedLogins] [int] NOT NULL,
 [lastFailedLogin] [datetime] NOT NULL,
 [lastFailedLoginIP] [varchar](15) NOT NULL)

Step 2: Create the stored procedure

create procedure myLogUserVisit(
  @username as Varchar(255),
  @success as int,
  @lastfailedLoginIP as varchar(15))
as
   IF ( EXISTS ( SELECT username
                  FROM   dbo.myLoginAuditing
                  WHERE  username = @username ) )
    BEGIN
    if (@success = 1)
    Begin
      update myLoginAuditing set
numberofSuccessfulLogins = numberofSuccessfulLogins + 1
        where username = @username
    End
    else
    begin
      update myLoginAuditing set
numberofFailedLogins = numberofFailedLogins + 1,
                    lastFailedLogin = GetDate(),
                    lastfailedLoginIP = @lastFailedLoginIP
        where username = @username
    end
  END
  ELSE
  BEGIN
    if (@success = 1)
    Begin
      insert into myLoginAuditing (username, numberofSuccessfulLogins,
numberoffailedlogins, lastfailedlogin, lastfailedloginip)
values (@username, 1, 0, '01.01.1900', '')
    End
    else
    begin
      insert into myLoginAuditing (username, numberofSuccessfulLogins,
numberoffailedlogins, lastfailedlogin, lastfailedloginip)
values (@username, 0, 1, GetDate(), @lastfailedLoginIP)
    end   
  END

Alexander did a smart thing - he looked at the various aspnet* sp's.

Step 3: Write the Membership provider

The class skeleton looks like this:

public class MyMembershipProvider : SqlMembershipProvider
{
public override bool ValidateUser(string username, string password)
{
}

public override void Initialize(string name, System.Collections.Specialized.NameValueCollection config)
{
}

public override MembershipUser GetUser(string username, bool userIsOnline)
{
}
}

Initialize is the easy but essential part - we need the connection string name for later:

private string connectionStringName;

public override void Initialize(string name, System.Collections.Specialized.NameValueCollection config)
{
connectionStringName = config["connectionStringName"];
base.Initialize(name, config);
}

Now we can validate the user - well, the base class does that. We only do the auditing part:

public override bool ValidateUser(string username, string password)
{
HttpContext.Current.Trace.Write("ValidateUser:entry");

bool bSuccess = base.ValidateUser(username, password);

string connectionString = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings[connectionStringName].ConnectionString;

SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(connectionString);
SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("exec myLogUserVisit @username, @success, @IP", conn);

cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@username", username);
if (bSuccess)
  cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@success", 1);
else
  cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@success", 0);

cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@IP", HttpContext.Current.Request.UserHostAddress);

conn.Open();
cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
conn.Close();

HttpContext.Current.Trace.Write("ValidateUser:exit");

return bSuccess;
}

Step 4: Set it up - web.config

  <appSettings/>
  <connectionStrings>
    <add name="MyNWind" connectionString="Data Source=cbc05vpc\cbc05;Initial Catalog=Northwind;User=sa;Password=P@ssw0rd"/>
  </connectionStrings>
 
  <system.web>
    <membership defaultProvider="SuperDuperMSProv">
      <providers>
        <clear/>
        <add name="SuperDuperMSProv" connectionStringName="MyNWind" type="MyMembershipProvider"/>
      </providers>
    </membership>

Step 5: View the auditing information - default.aspx.cs

The final "UI" looks like this:

The source code is rather simple:

protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
MyMembershipUser currentUser = (MyMembershipUser)Membership.GetUser();

Label1.Text = currentUser.FullName;
string lcConnection = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["MyNWind"].ConnectionString;

SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(lcConnection);

SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("select * from myLoginAuditing where username=@username", conn);
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Username", currentUser.UserName);

conn.Open();

SqlDataReader reader = cmd.ExecuteReader();

GridView1.DataSource = reader;
GridView1.DataBind();

reader.Close();
conn.Close();
}

Done. By the way, did you notice something? Right! Alexander never fell into the trap of SQL Injection.

ExtendingMembershipProviderDemo.zip (5.64 KB)

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET | Community | Security
Monday, 25 July 2005 19:46:16 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Friday, 08 July 2005
I'm sitting right now in that session. The speaker is just demoing yet another example which has a SQL Injection vulnerability! The killer: a script callback that uses the params unvetted to dynamically build a SQL string. MS definitely should vet the demos for security problems.
Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET | Security | this
Friday, 08 July 2005 12:31:39 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [1]

 



#  Wednesday, 06 July 2005
Stefan Schackow (PM ASP.NET team) just demoed this cool little application here at the chalk & talk session @ TechEd in Amsterdam. The really interesting part is how to flow authentication information such as username and roles securely to the ASP application.
Wednesday, 06 July 2005 09:33:57 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Sunday, 26 June 2005
The German .NET community's July event, the ASP.NET 2.0 Community Boot Camp aka CBC05 is now fully booked! It feels absolutely great that we (speakers are almost exclusively MVPs) were able to organize a five day training event on ASP.NET 2.0 by the community for the community. See you in Bad Ischl in July!
Sunday, 26 June 2005 11:08:55 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Saturday, 28 May 2005

This Thursday afternoon I attended the rerun of the VSTO session (Microsoft Visual Studio Tools for Microsoft Office System - quite a mouthfull, I'll stick with VSTO) in the Smart Client track (my main track was VSTE - Visual Studio Team Edition). Wow! The 2003 version didn't impress me at all when I saw it back then. But 2005 really rocks. Catherine Heller (Technical Evangelist) did a nice demo in Excel. The way the document is design- and programmable, access to the action pane and rolling your own smart tags is almost too easy. Forget about VBA, serious Office development is now on the horizon.

VSTO 2005 Blog

VSTO 2005 Beta Page

What's New in Visual Studio 2005 Tools for Office

Saturday, 28 May 2005 21:09:07 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Wednesday, 25 May 2005
Details on Brian Goldfarb's blog. Read the announcement / Go there
Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET | Community | Visual Studio
Wednesday, 25 May 2005 23:55:01 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Tuesday, 24 May 2005
Dino Esposito has posted code updates here for his book Introduction to ASP.NET 2.0. I was tech editor on this book, so I definitely recommend getting the book (and no, I don't get anything for this shameless plug).
Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET | Books | Cool Download | this
Tuesday, 24 May 2005 14:57:29 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Thursday, 12 May 2005
Found on Nikhil's blog: the ASP.NET Development Helper. Absolutely cool.
Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET | Cool Download
Thursday, 12 May 2005 16:47:01 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Tuesday, 10 May 2005

A functionality that comes in way handy when fixing somebody else's not so stellar source code is Edit / Format Document. I do like my tag names correctly cased, and this feature does that plus more.

In other German community news: the Web site for the ASP.NET 2.0 Community Bootcamp is now online, and there is a new hole being played at the CodeFairway.

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | Visual Studio
Tuesday, 10 May 2005 20:52:02 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Monday, 18 April 2005

Two more important downloads in addition to all the other B2 craze:

The # of VPC images starts skyrocketing (now that's a stupid word combination) on my dev machine...

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | Cool Download | SQL Server
Monday, 18 April 2005 21:07:02 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 

http://lab.msdn.microsoft.com/vs2005/golive/license/default.aspx

If you want to deploy applications on Beta 2 for live internal usage or by third parties, you need to accept the Go-Live license.

Categories: .NET | 2 Ohhhh
Monday, 18 April 2005 13:57:18 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 

As everyone is blogging about the obvious, I will stick to the more interesting bits (in my opinion, of course). For example, the updated Visual Studio 2005 Team Foundation Server Installation Guide.

Categories: .NET | 2 Ohhhh | Team System | Visual Studio
Monday, 18 April 2005 08:51:47 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Thursday, 03 March 2005


#  Thursday, 24 February 2005

In the article The 80/20 Rule for Web Application Security, there is one security solution proposed to protect sensitive cookies: adding the httpOnly flag. This attribute prevents cookies from being accessed through client-side script, thus mitigating the risk of cross-site scripting.

All you have to do in ASP.NET 2.0 to take advantage of this security feature is to add the httpCookies element with the httpOnlyCookies attribute set to true to web.config:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<configuration xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/.NetConfiguration/v2.0">
    <system.web>
        <httpCookies httpOnlyCookies="true"/>
    </system.web>
</configuration>

That's it - but you are still free to override this on a per-cookie basis.

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET | Security
Thursday, 24 February 2005 06:01:40 (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Wednesday, 23 February 2005

A new property has been added to the TextBox control you already know: the AutoCompleteType property. What does it do? It let's you specify the field of a user's vCard to automatically populate the TextBox. Take a look at the following form:

autocompletetype_img1.png

The user must type in the name every time she is on the form. Tedious. No longer if you assign the DisplayName vCard attribute to the TextBox:

autocompletetype_img2.png

Now, if you had typed in your display name in a different form already, it will automatically pop up as a choice when filling in the form:

autocompletetype_img3.png

The screenshot already implies that this is a cross-browser feature, the generated HTML source code does indeed confirm this assumption:

<input name="txtName" type="text" vcard_name="vCard.DisplayName" id="txtName" />

Yet another nice feature of ASP.NET 2.0 to look forward to.

Categories: .NET | 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET
Wednesday, 23 February 2005 04:26:49 (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Tuesday, 22 February 2005

Once again working on my backlog... interested in ASP.NET 2.0? Then watch the videos on this page. Jeff Prosise talks about Web Forms, State Management, Security, Master Pages and Site Navigation, Data Access as well as Application Infrastructure.

Categories: .NET | 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET | Training and Conferences
Tuesday, 22 February 2005 20:21:34 (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Saturday, 12 February 2005

New in the Download Center: an ISO image of Exploring ASP.NET 2.0 Using Visual C# 2005 (CD1), a training course provided by AppDev. CD Contents include:

  • AppDev user interface
  • Video demonstrations
  • Testing
  • Full courseware on PDF covering the content on the CD

As stated in the title, I am currently downloading. So I can't yet tell what is all in there.

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET | Cool Download
Saturday, 12 February 2005 10:51:13 (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [1]

 



#  Friday, 21 January 2005

In case you have been wondering "What is he doing?" - I have been busy preparing my three talks for the ASP konferenz and VS2005 konferenz respectively:

  • ASP.NET 2.0 Master Pages and Themes
  • ASP.NET 2.0 Membership and Security
  • Visual Studio Team System Team Developer in-depth
Friday, 21 January 2005 12:39:24 (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Thursday, 23 December 2004

This is the most current version of the Team Foundation Installation Guide for the December 2004 CTP release of Visual Studio Team System. It contains any changes that were made to the guide since the public release of the December 2004 CTP release of Visual Studio Team System.

Categories: .NET | 2 Ohhhh | Team System | Visual Studio
Thursday, 23 December 2004 08:36:04 (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [1]

 



#  Friday, 10 December 2004

I’m one of those next-cool-thing addicts that can’t resist to play with the latest most unstable Whidbey CTP coming out of Redmond. One of the red-hot things is generics that will be included with C#^H^H the CLR v2.0. This intentional blunder is the central point of this editorial - clearing up misconceptions about generics.

When reading postings or talking to fellow early .NET 2.0 adopters you come to categorize those into the following distinct groups:

  • The C++ developers
  • The Non-C#, Non-VB.NET, Non-Managed C++ developer
  • The Java developer (yes, I know…)
  • Generics, huh?

Let’s start out with the die-hard C++ programmer, a guy who really is in love with the templating system in C++ (when referring to C++ I really mean the unmanaged C++ world). This is the most vocal among the four groups, and they’ll be very forthcoming in telling you how much better C++ templates are than generics in C#. I hate to break the news to them, but generics are intentionally different: firstly, and most importantly, C++ templates are compile time only, whereas generics are compile as well as runtime. Anders Hejlsberg did a great job of explaining that in [1], and the C# team has a FAQ online on this topic too [2].

Secondly, the being different goal also extends to simplicity of use. Do you remember yourself screaming bloody murder when C# came along with single inheritance? Right. How many people did and do care in real life? See. Same here in generics-land: certain power has been stripped from you because it would tip the balance from easy to use to intimidating and overly complicated. That’s why constraints don’t cover the whole complexity spectrum and don’t allow operator constraining and the like, such as non-default constructor constraints. Oh, you can fake operator constraints if you really, really care with the approach detailed in [1] and [3], but admittedly this won’t solve the problems for intrinsic types.

Speaking of operator constraints constraints (couldn’t resist), a general misconception in the C++ camp is that everything they are used to should be just as dangerous – pardon me, powerful – in other implementations. C++ templates allow you to do what you damn well please, but generics don’t – that very type checking is the one thing to single out that rid us of AVs, remember?

The Non-C#, Non-VB.NET, Non-Managed C++ developer. So who are they? Try one of 30+ (don’t quote me on the actual figure) other programming languages that follow the CLS (Common Language Specification) and produce code that can run on the CLR. It is rather similar if not exactly the same as with Edit and Continue support – “me too!” is heard all around the globe. So, do they get generics? Depends. Because of the many programming languages that exist for .NET, Microsoft decided to not put generics in the CLS. So it is entirely up to the language vendor in 2.0 to support generics or not.

Has the C#/VB.NET developer any beef with that? You bet. If you write a framework that has to be used in other programming languages, that framework has to be CLS compliant (“should be” is too soft in my view). And this means you cannot use generics on the public interfaces if you want to mark your assembly with the CLSCompliant attribute. The Non-CLS compliance of generics is pointed out in [4] and [5], with hints that generics will find their way into the Common Language Specification in the Orcas / Longhorn timeframe.

The Java developer. Now, how do they fit into the picture of the early adopter of .NET 2.0? I’m sure one thing .NET developers will hear a lot is that “Java had generics long before .NET.” Not so fast, Scotty. Just like there are differences between C++ templates and .NET generics, there are differences between Java generics and their counterparts in .NET. Once again, Anders Hejlsberg did a great job in [1] of explaining what is different: for one, .NET generics are actually typed, which means no boxing for value types (a very good thing!). Secondly, .NET generics are runtime too, not just compile time – you can reflect on generics in .NET, you can’t do that in Java. The lowdown: generics in Java spare you the task of casting, but that’s about it.

Finally, the group “Generics, huh?” Those are developers who for example still have the misconception that generics are a C#-only feature, like many programmers using 1.0 initially thought that features offered by the CLR were actually C# features. Let’s chalk that one up to miscommunication, but a repeated one.

You know that generics (will) exist, but have no clear idea what they are intended to be used for? I’d like to quote Anders Hejlsberg: “Generics is essentially the ability to have type parameters on your type.”[1] D’accord? Really simple but really powerful.

You know what generics are (if not, please see the previous paragraph), but have no idea what to use them for? If you are like one of my friends “I’m not in the business of writing frameworks, and the .NET framework already has generic collections, so what use are generics to me?”, rest assured that there are plenty of other non-class uses: generic methods (data access, anyone?) and generic delegates (in an instant makes callbacks that much more fun). Did you know about those two generics use cases?

To conclude this editorial, I’d like to firmly state that generics are positioned somewhere between being  “just a fancy way of replacing typed collections” and the all-too-powerful for shooting yourself in the foot C++ templates. Well designed, tightly integrated in the CLR, the right dose of power – with one problem: too many different views of what generics are, what they are intended for, and what they can be used for. I for one am confident that they will be useful to programmers – yes, useful –  nothing more, nothing less.

[1] Generics in C#, Java, and C++
http://www.artima.com/intv/generics.html

[2] How do C# generics compare to C++ templates?
http://blogs.msdn.com/csharpfaq/archive/2004/03/12/88913.aspx

[3] Generics Algorithms
http://blogs.msdn.com/ericgu/archive/2003/11/14/52852.aspx

[4] Dan Fernandez's Blog - Quick information on Generics
http://blogs.msdn.com/danielfe/archive/2004/06/21/161962.aspx

[5] Q&A with VJ# and C# Team on Generics
http://www.thedatafarm.com/blog/CommentView.aspx?guid=a71779f2-7a6a-4df1-81d4-3ccaa2f18cff

[6] An introduction to Generics
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/dv_vstechart/html/csharp_generics.asp

Bootnote: This blog entry originallly was intended to be an editoral, however, an editorial is an opinion piece, and the publisher wanted a different opinion. This is why the text is now in my blog where you can read (and flame) it freely.

Categories: .NET | 2 Ohhhh | C# | this
Friday, 10 December 2004 10:22:26 (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Tuesday, 16 November 2004

Brian has the details in his blog for the two changes:

  • ASP.NET 2.0 Directory Naming Changes
  • ASP.NET 2.0 Compilation Model Changes
Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET
Tuesday, 16 November 2004 13:10:00 (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Monday, 15 November 2004

You can download two PowerPoint slide decks from Visual Studio 2005 Team System presentations at DevConnections in Las Vegas (November 2004):

  • VMS352 - Visual Studio 2005 Team System: Software Project Management
    In this session you will learn how to take advantage of the combined power of Visual Studio, the Microsoft Office System, and industry proven practices to successfully manage software projects—from conception to deployment.
  • VMS355 - Visual Studio 2005 Team System: Enterprise Class Source Control & Work Item Tracking
    This session introduces the new Team Foundation Server in Visual Studio 2005, including the new Source Code Control, Work Item Tracking and Team Portal. See how an integrated and extensible server-based system will boost your team’s productivity by significantly streamlining your development processes.
Monday, 15 November 2004 08:30:51 (W. Europe Standard Time, UTC+01:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Friday, 24 September 2004

This episode introduces Visual Basic Express using the same demo that was used during the launch at TechEd Europe. Jay Roxe shows how the streamlined IDE makes development approachable to novice developers but still allows the power of the Windows Forms designers and Visual Basic language.

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | Visual Studio
Friday, 24 September 2004 08:00:57 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Friday, 17 September 2004

In this episode, Brian Goldfarb shows some of the new tools enhancements that are coming with Visual Web Developer 2005 Express Edition and Visual Studio 2005. See enhancements to both design editor and code editor like validation, Intellisense improvements, source code preservation, and more. Video download

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET | Visual Studio
Friday, 17 September 2004 08:32:37 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Thursday, 02 September 2004

Kent Sharkey has posted changes to the special directory names used by ASP.NET v2.0. See his blog entry for details.

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET
Thursday, 02 September 2004 07:50:36 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Wednesday, 01 September 2004

If you happen to be a MSDN subscriber, then the Beta 1 Refresh has landed for you in the download section - including Team System! Be sure to read Rob Caron's post on what is definitely needed (installed), and what you might want to download too.

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | Visual Studio
Wednesday, 01 September 2004 11:33:02 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Tuesday, 24 August 2004

C5 is a library of generic collection classes for the upcoming version 2.0 of the .Net platform. C5 extends the standard .Net System.Collections.Generic namespace with tree data structures, heap based priority queues and hash indexed array lists and linked lists, making it more comprehensive than most collection class libraries on similar platforms. Unlike many other collection class libraries, C5 is designed with a strict policy of supporting "code to interface not implementation".

Now that definitely looks worth checking out!

Categories: .NET | 2 Ohhhh | Use the source Luke | C#
Tuesday, 24 August 2004 08:35:52 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Tuesday, 17 August 2004

Shanku Niyogi, ASP.NET Group Program Manager posted a blog entry on Upcoming Changes to ASP.NET 2.0 in Beta 2. Now, any further questions why I keep trying to convince people not to start production projects on a non-feature freeze Beta version?

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET
Tuesday, 17 August 2004 05:50:48 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 

Finally got my hands on Dino Esposito's book Introducing Microsoft ASP.NET 2.0. The term "finally" has a special meaning for me: I was the technical editor on this book, and quite a lot of work went into this book project, because writing such a book isn't done in a day, and ASP.NET 2.0 was/is a moving target. So even with the most stringent editing, there inevitably will be some "mistakes" caused by changes.

In the Acknowledgements, Dino writes "Christoph Wille, who reviewed the contents from a technical perspective, was one of the most attentive and insightful reviewers I have ever had (and I have written quite a few books)." He has a gift for words - a royal pain in the posterior would be the tagline I'd choose for myself.

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET | this
Tuesday, 17 August 2004 04:16:41 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Saturday, 14 August 2004

The walkthroughs are located on GDN as a project. It says "These walkthrough projects will help you exercise the functionality of Visual Studio 2005 Team System. These walkthrough projects support the walkthroughs on unit testing, web testing, load testing, profiling and code analysis that appear in the Visual Studio 2005 Team System documentation."

Saturday, 14 August 2004 12:48:39 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Wednesday, 04 August 2004

You can download a Channel 9 video interview with Jason Alexander on the topic of Burton (Visual Studio 2005 Team System). It also includes demonstrations, but be sure to bring lots of download bandwidth!

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | Team System | Visual Studio
Wednesday, 04 August 2004 19:16:22 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Tuesday, 03 August 2004

Now this is a cool sample - how to build a managed debugger. Some might say "So what?" but I think this is great way of getting a better understanding of the CLR and the workings of the debugging and profiling infrastructure of .NET.

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | Use the source Luke
Tuesday, 03 August 2004 16:26:29 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 

This month's issue of MSDN Magazine sports an article from Dino Esposito on the topic of script callbacks (read it). I consider script callbacks one of the cool features of ASP.NET 2.0, so be sure to check it out!

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET
Tuesday, 03 August 2004 10:52:00 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Tuesday, 27 July 2004

Continuing in the “What’s cool in 2.0” series, I’ll look at a BCL feature today. Imagine you have a Web form, and one of the values a user has to enter is a double. The not-so-ingenious version to accomplish the task is as follows:

void Button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
string val = TextBox1.Text;

// I'm sure: it is a double
double d = Double.Parse(val);
}

What’s wrong? Well, there are several things that could make your application go south, err, throw an exception: the value is null, the value is not a double, the value is out of range for a double (all three conditions are well-documented). So you rewrite your application like this:

double d = 0.0f;
try
{
d = Double.Parse(val);
}
catch (ArgumentNullException ane)
{
}
catch (FormatException fe)
{
}
catch (OverflowException oe)
{
}

This is how you would do it in 1.1, unless you first do a sanity check using regular expressions (remember: all input is evil until proven otherwise). So what is wrong here? The point is the exception throwing / catching in itself – it involves a stack walk, which equates to lost performance (especially nasty when we are talking heavy-load Web applications). Wouldn’t it be nice if we could get away without exceptions?

Good news! The BCL data types sport a new method – TryParse. Like the Parse method, it takes the input string as the first parameter. The input is followed by an out parameter, which was the return value of Parse – the return value of TryParse is a simple boolean: did the conversion succeed or did it fail. No exceptions.

The following code snippet shows how easy this is:

double d = 0.0f;
if (!Double.TryParse(val, out d))
{
// handle error condition
}

My advice: when porting 1.1 applications to 2.0, make sure that you convert all old Parse code to the new TryParse – your applications will perform and scale a lot better.

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | BCL
Tuesday, 27 July 2004 07:47:44 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Monday, 26 July 2004

Thomas (de) picked up the topic of validating multiple forms in ASP.NET 1.1 (de) - and was wondering if / how this is solved in 2.0. Great opportunity to start my series on "What's cool in 2.0". The good doctor is in!

One of the features on the (rather long) list of cool features in 2.0 is validation groups. It allows you to group certain controls - validators and controls that allow (auto-)postback - in a validation group: only the validators in the group that is posted back is actually being executed.

Let me illustrate, take a look at the following "two form page" (contrived as always):

In the old days of 1.1, when you clicked either of the two buttons, all validators would be executed, even though not all are applicable for both forms. In 2.0, all you have to do to sort out this dilemma is to set the ValidationGroup property:

Now when we run our sample application, only the validators associated with the respective "form" (validation group defined by the button) fire:

I'm sure that a lot of my fellow developers can't wait till this feature RTM's!

To wrap up, Stephen Walter wrote the article Changes to the Validation Controls in ASP.NET 2.0, which goes into more depth on the validation control changes.

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET
Monday, 26 July 2004 21:21:40 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [1]

 



#  Tuesday, 13 July 2004

Just in case you missed it - the Quickstarts are online. Definitely a quick way to get started and no, it is not strictly ASP.NET 2.0 only: Windows Forms, J# and Common Tasks make an appearance too.

Categories: 2 Ohhhh | ASP.NET
Tuesday, 13 July 2004 16:15:22 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Thursday, 08 July 2004

Next week I'll be giving a talk on Visual Studio 2005 IDE enhancements in Graz, Austria. The German description for this talk:

"Willkommen in der PowerPoint-freien Zone! Dieser Vortrag ist 100% Hands-On zum Thema "Was ist neu in VS.NET 2005" - also nicht Framework Features sondern (neue) IDE-Features ist der Inhalt dieses Talks. Von Refactoring zu Debugging, Klassendesigner und IntelliSense und vielen anderen Verbesserungen im Bereich des Editing und der Unterstützung durch Tools. "

Thursday, 08 July 2004 15:11:20 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



#  Thursday, 01 July 2004

There is a download of an interview with Alan Griver and Ken Levy of Visual Studio data team, which includes one hot top: things that didn't make it into 2.0.

Categories: 2 Ohhhh
Thursday, 01 July 2004 10:10:50 (W. Europe Daylight Time, UTC+02:00)  #    Comments [0]

 



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